Thursday, 23 September 2010

23.09.2010

Moon lore, 
excerpt:

The servant maid Grete also, a living book of fairy tales among her people, explains 
the moon wandering as nothing else than the result of an unsatisfied sense desire. There was a young knight who had wooed a rich woman of gentle birth. Shortly before midnight they were both led into the bridal chamber. “Yet hardly were they alone together when a strange voice outside before the castle called, ‘Conrad, come down here! Conrad, come down here!’ And again it called, ‘Conrad, come down here!’ The voice sounded so plaintive and at the same time so threatening. The bridegroom said, ‘That is my best friend; he is in need and calls me.’ The maiden said however, ‘The voice belongs to my cousin, who was found dead two years ago.’ Then she shuddered so that the gooseflesh stood up over her whole body,” and she implored her bridegroom not to follow the evil spirit or at least to remain with her until the ghostly hour was past and the full moon was up. But he would not be restrained: “Be it an evil spirit or a good, no one shall call me in vain!” “And he went out. The lady went to the window but could see nothing for the darkness outside and for the tears in her eyes. Then the haunted hour was over and the full moon arose and she waited and waited, but the knight never returned. Thereupon she swore to take no rest on a night when the moon was full until she had gone to bed with her bridegroom. And as her first bridegroom never and nevermore came back, so she waited for another, but there was no one who knew her story who would woo her, because each one thought it would fare with him as it had fared with that other. Thus she died; her oath is however still unfulfilled. Whenever it is full moon, she is looking out to see if any bridegroom comes and she laments sorely, and holds her hands weeping toward the moon.”

Source: Sleep Walking and Moon Walking, A Medico-Literary Study, by Dr. J. Sadger  (Vienna), New York and Washington Nervous and Mental Disease Publishing Company, 1920


www.gutenberg.org


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