Monday, 30 March 2015

30.03.2015

contour |ˈkɒntʊə|noun(usu. contoursan outline representing or bounding the shape or form of something: she traced the contours of his face with her finger | figurative :challenges that have shaped the contours of European integration.• an outline of a natural feature such as a hill: the road climbs steadily,following the contours of the hillside.• short for contour line. below the 1200-ft contour is a belt of limestone.• a line joining points on a diagram at which some property has the same value. the figure shows contours of 21-cm line emission of atomic hydrogen.a way in which something varies, especially the pitch of music or thepattern of tones in an utterance.verb [ with obj. ]mould into a specific shapeespecially one designed to fit into something else: the compartment has been contoured with smooth rounded corners | (asadj.contouredthe contoured leather seats.mark (a map or diagramwith contour lines: (as adj.contoureda hugecontoured map.(of a road or railwayfollow the outline of (a topographical feature),especially along a contour line: the road contours the hillside.ORIGIN mid 17th cent.: from French, from Italian contornofromcontornare draw in outline, from con- togethertornare to turn.


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